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AAHA, Kansas State back Veterinary Nurse Initiative

KSU veterinary technicians get a new job title, at least on campus.

AAHA, Kansas State back Veterinary Nurse Initiative

The American Animal Hospital Association and the Kansas State University College of Veterinary Medicine have thrown their support behind the Veterinary Nurse Initiative, a campaign aimed at formally changing the job title of veterinary technicians nationwide.

AAHA’s board of directors voted in favor of the initiative at a fall meeting.

“At AAHA, we are all about standardization and excellence,” said CEO Michael Cavanaugh, DVM, DABVP (Emeritus). “By standardizing the term ‘veterinary nurse,’ we increase consistency throughout the profession while also growing professional recognition and relevancy among pet owners. Ultimately, this makes our profession stronger.”

Veterinary technicians employed at Kansas State University are now known as veterinary nurses following a policy change that went into effect Oct. 21. The legally recognized title, however, remains registered veterinary technician because of current licensing nomenclature, the university reported.

“We endeavor to be at the forefront of veterinary medicine in Kansas, to educate the students we support in the most effective ways to utilize their health care team and to enable greater public understanding of our role in veterinary medicine,” said KSU ophthalmology veterinary nurse Katie Huyer.

Other veterinary colleges backing the Veterinary Nurse Initiative include those at Lincoln Memorial University, Michigan State University, Purdue University and the University of Tennessee.

The initiative enjoys broad industry support from companies such as Banfield Pet Hospital, Royal Canin USA and MWI Animal Health and organizations like the Portland Veterinary Medical Association and the North American Veterinary Community, publisher of Today’s Veterinary Business.

The National Association of Veterinary Technicians in America launched the Veterinary Nurse Initiative in 2017. The title change requires the approval of state legislatures or licensing bodies. Farthest along is Ohio, where legislation has advanced to the House Agriculture and Rural Development Committee.

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